The Light of the Falling Stars | Book, Essay

The Light of the Falling Stars
Book details:
Pages: 307
Rating: 3.4

Original Title The Light of the Falling Stars

ISBN 1573226823 (ISBN13: 9781573226820 )

Edition Language English

Genres:
Fiction :: Adult Fiction :: Novels

Book description:

A plane falls from the sky as a couple argues in their yard, the whine of its engines drowning out their voices, parts of the craft shearing off the roof of their house. A few miles away, a young man waits for his girlfriend at the airport, while in a long-empty house, an old woman anticipates the return of the husband who left her many years ago. The crash of an airplane on the outskirts of Marshall, Montana, takes more than just the lives of those on board. Two days later, a stranger appears at the home of the couple who watched the plane go down. The lone survivor of the disaster, he becomes a witness to the disintegration of the couple's marriage. With striking compassion and knowingess, J. Robert Lennon depicts the lives of these and other residents of Marshall as they struggle to recover normaley in their lives and imagine a future after tragedy.




Book Authors:

J. Robert Lennon

J. Robert Lennon is the writer of a narrative aggregation, Pieces For The Left Hand, and seven novels, including Mailman, Familiar, and Happyland. He holds an Master of fine arts from the University of Montana, and has published short fiction in The New Yorker, Harper 's, Playboy, Granta, The Paris Review, Electric Literature, and elsewhere. He has been anthologized in Best American Short Stories, Best American Nonrequired Reading, and Prize Narratives: The O. Henry Awards, and his narrative The Rememberer inspired the CBS detective series Unforgettable. He hosts the podcast Writers at Cornell, and co-hosts another, Lunch Box, with poet Ed Skoog. His book reappraisals have appeared in The New York Times Book Review, The Guardian, and The London Review of Books, and he lives in Ithaca, New York, where he teaches composing at Cornell University.
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The Light of the Falling Stars Essay




This was one of the most absorbing reads I 've of all time experienced. From the first page to the last I was exhaustively involved with the narrative and all the characters. I was really regretful when the book ended. I was truly basking this book until someplace early in Part Two, it merely veered off into something Wyrd. The narrative had so much promise but the writer seemed to hold changed it from an interesting read about the lives people affected by a calamity into the saga of Paul and Anita Beveridge 's messed up lives/marriage. Can you state BORING! ? ! I think this was about subsister 's guilt, but I 'm non certain. I liked this book good plenty, which I guess translates into a B- . The subtraction is for forgettability, because I do n't believe much from this book will lodge with me. I think it 's the early work of a good author with better books in front of him ( good, behind him now, because this was published in 1997 and Lennon has put out several novels since so. The one I truly want to read, Pieces for the Left Hand, has n't been published in the U.S. And his latest books is being serialized in Harper 's, so that 's non something I can put my custodies on right now either. Hence dunking into the back catalog ) . I picked up a transcript of The Light Of Falling Stars at The Children 's Society charity store in Garstang. A good spent 99p! The Light of Falling Stars is a introduction novel by J. Robert Lennon. In visible radiation of events of September 2001, I found this book to be stalking and insightful. It follows several occupants of the little town of Marshall, Montana after a plane clangs in some forests on the outskirts of town. Of the over 50 riders kiled in the clang, 31 of them are from Marshall. But the book does n't state the narrative of those who were killed, it alternatively focuses on those that they left buttocks. I have an affinity for writers whose chief supporter is botching, lost, seeking for something but finally clueless as to what or where it is. It 's likely an disposed description for my ain life truly. That 's likely why this book has stuck with me so long. By no means a truly great book, it 's truly merely O.K. , but I can see great things in the hereafter for this cat. In fact, I can non wait to see what else he has written. It 's a really nice debut to an writer who may good rank in with my other faves ( Murakami-san, Auster, Chang-Rae Lee, etc ) . OK, but non great -- this book missed the Zeitgeist on the plane clang subsister subject. In a pre-Lost, pre-Survivor universe, this likely would hold fascinated me more, but at this point it 's a stock narration and feels expected. An interesting proposition, but finally instead dull. Surely, given a plot line based around a crashed airplane, it must be possible to contorting some emotion out of the reader but I remained distant from all the characters from start to complete. The endorsement on the dorsum says the narrative is about 'the entropy of loss ' . Fair plenty, but it seemed to me the writer went out of his manner to toss indiscriminately from one character to another without of all time truly acquiring under the surface of the state of affairs. I thought we were acquiring someplace with Christine and her kidney graft, but this promising plotline evaporated like all the others This book for me was a immense heap of beautiful prose that amounted to really small, sort of like reading an ethereal recognizing card. There 's a plane clang in a little town in Montana, touching on five people in four narratives, and their lives are changed as they reach some decisions. I began to experience like I was stuck in this little town and driving about in circles. The moral of this narrative seems to be: in malice of everything that happens to you, there 's no traveling back and life goes on. Oh, thanks, I 'd break compose that down. I liked following the different people in the narrative, and seeing how their lives changed. The one thing I did n't wish was how Trixie 's narrative was n't tied in with the other characters. Everyone else met another character. Everyone was connected in some manner, except for Trixie. Possibly because of this, I was the most defeated with her narrative. I wanted to cognize Trixie 's life the most, but at that place was so small information. An uneven introduction novel, there were parts that were really redolent and so someplace in the center of the book it got tiring. And I was really defeated with Bernardo. Who survives a fatal plane clang and tells no 1? ? But I did n't give up on the book so it had something that kept my involvement. I can see the ingredients for a great novel but it does n't come together absolutely. All and all, an gratifying, forgettable narrative. At times this book felt slightly voyeuristic as chapters switched positions following the lives of families/friends of plane clang victims. Some seemed to hold a difficult clip sorrowing and traveling on, others moved on as you would anticipate. In a little town, waies crossed in complicated ways, which was ever slightly a surprise to detect. A plane clangs into the forests behind a distant place. This is a subsisters narrative - the people who were left behind by those who died on the plane. Narrative is told from the position of the twosome in the house, an ex-wife of a victim, the fellow of a victim - and their best friend, and an existent subsister of the clang. We'll-crafted work. If you do non hold adequate wretchedness in your ain life, read this book to wallow in the wretchedness of 5+ characters whose atrocious life state of affairss converge in assorted ways. Yes, the narrative is really descriptive, but I found little to bask in this read. Never a bright topographic point, ne'er a minute of hope for any of these unfortunate folks. If I had a do-over, I 'd jump it. a book about a plane clang where people burst into cryings every 10 pages. dejecting but non without beauty/merit. the characters are written good plenty but i lost path of the secret plan at approximately page 200. this is his first novel which explains a batch. he developed his manner with much better consequences in 'The Funnies ' and 'Pieces for the Left Hand ' . I was looking for some sort of existent connexion between all of the characters in this book, but none was of all time truly developed. I 'm non certain I get what the writer was seeking to make... it was excessively obscure. This book could hold been truly good if it would n't hold contained so many disjointed, unsolved issues. As much about relationships as the plane clang which is the beginning of the narrative. How the subsister got along with his boy, the jobs of the twosome who took him in, the hubbies unusual relatonship with a malignant neoplastic disease patient. Well woven, good read. It starts off reasonably good as a book about covering with loss ( or calamity ) - about all the characters felt like they had some sort of dissociative upset - but it easy strays from that into something I could n't complete it... ..and I had to halt around page 140 or so. First feeling: this is a dated narrative in a station 9/11 universe. The traumatic premiss landed rather literally in sherds that were emotionally null and I had a difficult clip stressing with the sad batch of characters. Merely an All right book - found that I was non at all invested in most of the chief characters. Most were non sympathetic, and some of the narratives seemed random, drawn out, and so everything came to an disconnected terminal. I finished thiss book, even though I was boreed about halfway through. The premiss of a plane clang altering people 's lives was interesting at first. However, the characters were so self absorbed and shoal, I merely did n't care what happened to any of them. There was no flood tide to this book. I was n't truly fond of any of the characters. I read it and so shrugged. Interesting book... . though I still ca n't calculate out who the snake pit the old lady with the pencils is? ? Is she her ain character? Is she one of the other characters? If you like dysfunctional, down characters, you should wish this book. For a heavy read, non about every bit interesting as The Kite Runner. This narrative started out truly and sort of floundered in the center. Ended very well, tonss of loose terminals... like life, I guess! EXCELLENT book! I extremely recommend. I could n't set this one down and have been urging it to friends and household for old ages! The authorship is good, but I have a serious bias against this kind of multi-story, which has been overdone in films. I stuck with it for a 100 pages. Many lives change in the wake of a fatal rider plane clang. An piquant character survey, filled with realistically-drawn persons reacting, each in his ain manner, to tragedy and alter. Give it a 3.5 because of the good authorship. The book won Barnes and Noble 's Great New Writer Award in '97. It 's about a plane clang and how it affects the occupants of a little town in Montana.
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