Strange Weather: Culture, Science and Technology in the Age of Limits | Book, Essay

Strange Weather: Culture, Science and Technology in the Age of Limits
Book details:
Pages: 276
Rating: 3.89

Original Title Strange Weather: Culture, Science, and Technology in the Age of Limits (The Haymarket Series)

ISBN 0860915670 (ISBN13: 9780860915676 )

Edition Language English

Genres:
Nonfiction

Book description:

Who speaks for science in a technologically dominated society? In his latest work of cultural criticism Andrew Ross contends that this question yields no simple or easy answer. In our present technoculture a wide variety of people, both inside and outside the scientific community, have become increasingly vocal in exercising their right to speak about, on behalf of, and often against, science and technology. Arguing that science can only ever be understood as a social artifact, Strange Weather is a manifesto which calls on cultural critics to abandon their technophobia and contribute to the debates which shape our future. Each chapter focuses on an idea, a practice or community that has established an influential presence in our culture: New Age, computer hacking, cyberpunk, futurology, and global warming. In a book brimming over with intelligence—both human and electronic—Ross examines the state of scientific countercultures in an age when the development of advanced information technologies coexists uneasily with ecological warnings about the perils of unchecked growth. Intended as a contribution to a “green” cultural criticism, Strange Weather is a provocative investigation of the ways in which science is shaping the popular imagination of today, and delimiting the possibilities of tomorrow.




Book Authors:

Andrew Ross

Andrew Ross is Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University, and a societal militant. A subscriber to The Nation, the Village Voice, New York Times, and Artforum, he is the writer of many books, including, most late, Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World’s Least Sustainable City and Nice Work if You Can Get It: Life and Labor in Precarious Times.
---------------

Strange Weather: Culture, Science and Technology in the Age of Limits Essay




Ross is a Scots cultural critic and professor at NYU, a widely known member of the moving ridge of postmodern minds who came along in the 1990s. In this book he takes on a assortment of topics, but does non supply the sort of overall scrutiny of them that the rubric suggests. Rather, this reads like a aggregation of shorter essays on a few of the intersections of engineering and civilization. There are chapters on new age scientific discipline, computing machine hackers, scientific discipline fiction, and the germinating image of scientists and applied scientists. A. Outline: This book is about the oppositional engineerings. Oppositional engineerings are the values of groups that contest official scientific civilization or those who oppose authorization and institutional scientific discipline. Ross does non see either side as incorrect, he criticizes both every bit good as regards both. This is much like Gramsci’s theory of hegemony in which by accepting to a opinion category the suborbinates can derive some step of control. In Gramsci’s footings a “counter hegemony” is formed. Ross would name this an oppositional engineering Tek solukta okudugum kitaplardan I can safely set this right down the center at 3 stars. Its every bit good as it is bad, every bit insightful as it is bland, every bit obscure as it is comprehensive ; all on issues related to the intersection of civilization, scientific discipline, and engineering. But instead than a difficult scientific or journalistic review, this meeting of spheres is assessed through the lens of a cultural, post-modern critical theoretician. Ross was composing at a clip and context where such a position was merely proliferating to a popular audience from a coevals other than the original names in the motion ; nevertheless, he does n't compose to their criterions. A deficiency of lucidity, coherence, and dependable reason pervades this disparate aggregation of essays all rolling around the subtitle subject. This is non so much a scientific discipline book as a book about the ways scientific discipline maps as a manner to claim power and authorization. In this the aim is non so typical ( scientific discipline critics have long argued against its function as a system of truth. What is typical about Ross’s Hagiographas on scientific discipline is that he explores ways that ‘science’ is used by its critics – such as those in the New Age motion – as a agency of prolonging the truth of their positions. Other chapters explore other facets of science-in-culture, such as the relationships between scientific discipline fiction composing broader societal positions of scientific discipline. The standout chapter for me though is the concluding 1, researching the conditions: the nature author Annie Dillard one time wrote of her desire that people discuss the conditions because it is so interesting ; for Ross’s statement here the conditions is cardinal because of its relation to planetary heating in two ways. First, the ecology motion is typical because of its resort to science to warrant its claims ; 2nd, because conditions is how so many of us see clime. It is the 2nd facet that is more interesting given the national and nationalist buildings of the conditions, and the tenseness with the demand for a globalist response to planetary heating. ( As an aside, it is somewhat dejecting to read a 20-year-old position from the left of the political relations of planetary heating and the failings of corporatist responses, and be reminded merely how far corporatist and neo-colonial places have come to rule the planetary political relations of planetary heating: let’s non fall into the euphemism of ‘climate change’ . ) As ever, Ross is politically savvy, and in many ways one of our sharpest cultural critics: this is what cultural surveies should be like.
Tags:
Strange weather: culture, science and technology in the age of limits essay topics, strange weather: culture, science and technology in the age of limits essay thesis, strange weather: culture, science and technology in the age of limits critical essay, strange weather: culture, science and technology in the age of limits research paper, strange weather: culture, science and technology in the age of limits analysis essay, strange weather: culture, science and technology in the age of limits argumentative essay, strange weather: culture, science and technology in the age of limits college essay, strange weather: culture, science and technology in the age of limits essay help.

Books written by these Authors:
Beautiful Losers

See other books:

Captain Murderer

Captain Murderer

Captain Murderer, a possible relation of the Blue Beard family, weds a series of wealthy young girls that he then proceeds to kill and bake into a pie.

Politics and Morality

Politics and Morality

Public disenchantment with politics has become a key feature of the world in which we live. In this book, Susan Mendus asks if politicians can be morally good or whether politics is destined to involve dirty hands or the loss of integrity, as many modern philosophers claim.

Everything That Rises Must Converge

Everything That Rises Must Converge

Flannery O'Connor was working on Everything That Rises Must Converge at the time of her death. This collection is an exquisite legacy from a genius of the American short story, in which she scrutinizes territory familiar to her readers: race, faith, and morality. The stories...

Nanny

Nanny

Keston Hall, Buckinghamshire, is the seat of the Lydiard family and the imposing setting for a compelling love story that begins in 1907. Beautiful and spirited, Grace Merrill seems to stand with the world at her feet. But then, quite unexpectedly, a family tragedy obliges Grace to abandon her...